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The proclaimed goal of SpaceEngine is scientific realism, and to reproduce every type of known astronomical phenomenon.[1] It uses star catalogs along with procedural generation to create a cubical universe 10 billion parsecs (32.6 billion light-years) on each side, centered on the barycenter of the Solar System. Within the software, users can use search tools to filter through astronomical objects based on certain characteristics. In the case of planets and moons, specific environmental types, surface temperatures, and pressures can be used to filter through the vast amount of different procedurally generated worlds.




Search results for spaceengine



SpaceEngine's procedural generation algorithms are not 100% scientifically accurate, and can sometimes churn out unrealistic results. SpaceEngine's development team does fix, or at least attempt to fix, these issues when they arise, and are oftentimes successful. One such example is the removal of the old "step-stair terrain" bug that plagued older versions.


Researchers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston have found that a microwave thruster system that requires no propellant does indeed generate a small amount of thrust, Wired UK reported Thursday (July 31). If the technology pans out, it could make spaceflight far cheaper and speedier, potentially opening up much of the cosmos to exploration, advocates say.


"Test results indicate that the RF [radio frequency] resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and, therefore, is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma," the NASA team wrote in their study, which they presented Wednesday (July 30) at the 50th Joint Propulsion Conference in Cleveland. [Superfast Spacecraft Propulsion Concepts (Images)]


The roots of the propulsion system tested by the NASA team trace back to a British researcher named Roger Shawyer, who claims that his "EmDrive" generates thrust by rocketing microwaves around in a chamber. There is no need for propellant, as solar power can be used to produce the microwaves.


Shawyer says that his company, Satellite Propulsion Research Ltd., has successfully tested experimental versions of the thruster. But many scientists have dismissed or downplayed such claims, saying the propulsion system violates the law of conservation of momentum, Wired UK reported.


The thruster may work by somehow harnessing the subatomic particles that continuously pop into and out of existence, the NASA researchers suggest. The results and the technology are promising enough to warrant further study, they wrote in the study.


Michael Wall is a Senior Space Writer with Space.com and joined the team in 2010. He primarily covers exoplanets, spaceflight and military space, but has been known to dabble in the space art beat. His book about the search for alien life, \"Out There,\" was published on Nov. 13, 2018. Before becoming a science writer, Michael worked as a herpetologist and wildlife biologist. He has a Ph.D. in evolutionary biology from the University of Sydney, Australia, a bachelor's degree from the University of Arizona, and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz. To find out what his latest project is, you can follow Michael on Twitter."}; var triggerHydrate = function() window.sliceComponents.authorBio.hydrate(data, componentContainer); var triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate = function() if (window.sliceComponents.authorBio === undefined) var script = document.createElement('script'); script.src = ' -9-3/authorBio.js'; script.async = true; script.id = 'vanilla-slice-authorBio-component-script'; script.onload = () => window.sliceComponents.authorBio = authorBio; triggerHydrate(); ; document.head.append(script); else triggerHydrate(); if (window.lazyObserveElement) window.lazyObserveElement(componentContainer, triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate, 1500); else console.log('Could not lazy load slice JS for authorBio') } }).catch(err => console.log('Hydration Script has failed for authorBio Slice', err)); }).catch(err => console.log('Externals script failed to load', err));Mike WallSocial Links NavigationSenior Space WriterMichael Wall is a Senior Space Writer with Space.com (opens in new tab) and joined the team in 2010. He primarily covers exoplanets, spaceflight and military space, but has been known to dabble in the space art beat. His book about the search for alien life, "Out There," was published on Nov. 13, 2018. Before becoming a science writer, Michael worked as a herpetologist and wildlife biologist. He has a Ph.D. in evolutionary biology from the University of Sydney, Australia, a bachelor's degree from the University of Arizona, and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz. To find out what his latest project is, you can follow Michael on Twitter.


Selects a space object, ship, waypoint or spline path. Equivalent of a mouse click on the object, selecting it using search tool, etc. If the command succeeds, the selection pointer will be switched to the selected object. If the command fails, an error message will be shown in the console, and further execution of the scenario could be wrong. Syntax:Select Earth - selects a space object by its name. Quotes can be skipped if there are no spaces in object's name.Select "RS 8474-2738-5-27954-210 1" - selects a space object by its name. Use quotes if there are spaces in the object's name.Select "Waypoint 1" - selects a previously defined waypoint (see Waypoint).Select "Path 1" - selects a previously defined spline path (see SplinePath).To resolve name ambiguity, prepend object's name with its parent name, separated by . For example:Select "SaturnPandora" - selects Pandora (satellite of Satrun)Select "SolPandora" - selects asteroid (55) Pandora.


The easiest way to add a planet is to find a procedural planet in SpaceEngine which you like, duplicate it in your planetary system script, then tweak its parameters a bit as you desire. You can quickly find a planet close to your needs by using the Star browser. Open it by pressing [Shift]+[F3], enter the search radius 100 and press the [Filter settings] button, then choose the desired filter parameters. In this example, we are looking for a temperate Earth-sized terra near a G class star:


Press the [Ok] button and wait until SpaceEngine finishes the search. Then you may click on each row, open the Solar system browser ([F2] key) and look for the planets SpaceEngine has found. Tip: to know exactly which planets satisfied the filter options, hover the mouse cursor over the table cell in the 'Filter' column (last column). A small box will appear with a list of the planets in that system which met the filter options.


Almost all changes require pressing the [Update] button to apply. Pressing the [Reset] button will return the settings to those the planet had before you opened the Editor. This means that if you make some changes and close the editor, you won't be able to reset them back again. Only restarting SpaceEngine will reset them (remember, Editor does not save the changes to the file). So if you want to achieve good results, or if you want to be more skilled in creating planets, read the next chapter of this tutorial.


Last month, NASA researchers dropped news with potentially huge consequences for space travel and science as a whole: They ran an experiment whose results seem to defy the very laws of physics, and could change how we travel through outer space. Problem is, experts say that it's incredibly unlikely that Isaac Newton is wrong. Instead, the most likely explanation is the team simply made a mistake somewhere along the way


But what does that mean? What does being accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal mean? Does it mean the science is correct, the effect is real and that physics is broken? Consider that peer-reviewed journals publish all sorts of results that later turn out to be spurious, including:


What it means to be peer-reviewed is that an independent scientist who is an expert in the particular field read and reviewed the work undertaken, and found it to be of sufficient quality to be a valuable contribution to the field. It does not mean that the results and conclusion of the paper are necessarily correct, or even the last word on that particular issue.


Tajmar's results are exactly what you'd expect for the systematic error explanation: with a properly shielded apparatus, with no additional electromagnetic fields induced by the wires, there is no observed thrust at any power. They conclude that these induced fields by the electrical wires, visibly present in the other setups, are the likely culprit for the observed, unexplained thrust:


Our results show that the magnetic interaction from not sufficiently shielded cables or thrusters are a major factor that needs to be taken into account for proper µN thrust measurements for these type of devices.


Science never ends, and this paper, as compelling as it is, will surely not be the last word on the topic. Many will continue to research it, build prototypes, and search for thrust signatures without any exhaust: an action without a reaction. It may yet be possible, under some hitherto undiscovered conditions, that the action-reaction law is violated at some level. But the EmDrive probably isn't it. Pushing against the electromagnetic fields generated by your own electrical wires isn't a violation of action-reaction, and cannot power a spaceship. The EmDrive was billed as an "impossible" space drive, seeming too good to be true. Verification is always required, as is the complete elimination of systematic errors. As humans, we may be easily fooled, but to fool nature is not so simple. It looks like perpetual motion, as it always has been, is still just an impossible dream of ours. 041b061a72


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